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Thirty Six Essays/Sermons by Robert Gray

 Collection — Box: 1 [31151030134492]
Identifier: MS-0708
Copied from dealer description: The essays themselves are extremely well written displaying an impressive command of the English language; the idealistic nature of the essays strongly suggests the supposition that Gray was a minister and used these essays as the basis for weekly sermons. The range of subject matter is equally impressive; Gray moves effortlessly from a celebration of the life of George Washington to an Emersonian-like appreciation of Nature: "There is a visible consonance in all the vast expanse of Nature, a rhyme of unity.

Dates

  • circa 1860

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is housed off-site and requires 48-hours' notice for retrieval. Please contact Special Collections for more information.

Collection is open for use.

Conditions Governing Use

Single copies may be made for research purposes. Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions. It is not necessary to seek our permission as the owner of the physical work to publish or otherwise use public domain materials that we have made available for use, unless Johns Hopkins University holds the copyright.

Extent

0.167 Cubic Feet (2 items)

Biographical / Historical

Robert Gray died in 1876; he was the father of Margaret Gray (1865-1961), known as "Granka." The family believes that Robert Gray came from Western Pennsylvania and that he may have been associated with the Amish culture in that area. Source: dealer description.

Scope and Contents

Copied from dealer description: Written circa 1860. 117 leaves. Bound in a tall quarto (13" x 8 W') in black linen boards with deteriorating black spine. Signed on the front pastedown, "Robert Gray, Jan. 1, 1860. The 36 essays have been transcribed by the great-grandson of Robert Gray, John Howell, and are housed in a separate folder.

The essays themselves are extremely well written displaying an impressive command of the English language; the idealistic nature of the essays strongly suggests the supposition that Gray was a minister and used these essays as the basis for weekly sermons. The range of subject matter is equally impressive; Gray moves effortlessly from a celebration of the life of George Washington to an Emersonian-like appreciation of Nature: "There is a visible consonance in all the vast expanse of Nature, a rhyme of unity.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Donated by John P. Howell, July 2015.

Processing Information

Processed by Jordon Steele, August 2015. Includes typewritten transcript of the manuscript.

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

Contact:
The Sheridan Libraries
Special Collections
3400 N Charles St
Baltimore MD 21218 USA