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Broadside advertising American elk exhibition at the Lyceum Theatre, London

 Collection — Container: 1 [31151030119063], Folder: 3
Identifier: MS-0756
In 1765, a building was erected on an adjacent site of today's Lyceum Theatre by the architect James Payne for exhibitions and, later, for other entertainments. The theatre finally became a licensed house in 1809. One of these entertainments was that of the exhibition of an American Elk in 1792, as noted in this broadside printed in 1792 in London.

Dates

  • 1792

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is housed off-site and requires 48-hours' notice for retrieval. Contact Special Collections for more information. Collection is open for use.

Conditions Governing Use

Single copies may be made for research purposes. Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions. It is not necessary to seek our permission as the owner of the physical work to publish or otherwise use public domain materials that we have made available for use, unless Johns Hopkins University holds the copyright.

Extent

0.167 Cubic Feet (1 legal size folder)

Biographical / Historical

In 1765, a building was erected on an adjacent site of today's Lyceum Theatre by the architect James Payne for the exhibitions of The Society of Artists, which disbanded three years later when the Royal Academy of the Arts succeeded it. The building was then leased out for dances and other entertainments, including musical entertainments by Charles Dibdin. Famed actor David Garrick also performed there. In 1794, the composer Samuel Arnold Sr rebuilt the interior of the building, making it into a proper theatre, but through the opposition of the existing patent theatres, he was not granted a patent. Therefore, he leased it to other entertainments again, including Philip Astley, who brought his circus there when his amphitheatre was burned down at Westminster. It was also used as a chapel, a concert room, and for the first London exhibition of waxworks displayed by Madame Tussaud in 1802. The theatre finally became a licensed house in 1809.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyceum_Theatre,_London

Content Description

The first few lines of the broadside reads:

"Just Arrived from America, and to be seen in the elegant Front Room of the Lyceum, in the Strand,the wonderful American Elk, upwards of Thirteen Hands and a Half high, justly deemed one of the greatest curiosities of animated Nature, and the only one of the Species, ever seen in Great Britain."

The broadside was printed in 1792 in London.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

This item was purchased from Howard S. Mott, Inc. in August 2011.

Processing Information

Processed by Annie Tang in August 2016.

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

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