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John Holladay Latané papers

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0130
John Holladay Latané was a history professor at Johns Hopkins University born in Staunton, Virginia on April 1, 1869. The collection consists of writings, lectures and speeches, correspondence, research material, and material on the invention of the McCormick Reaper spanning 1913-1930.

Dates

  • 1913-1930

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is housed off-site and requires 48-hours' notice for retrieval. Please contact Special Collections for more information.

Collection is open for use.

Conditions Governing Use

Single copies may be made for research purposes. Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions. It is not necessary to seek our permission as the owner of the physical work to publish or otherwise use public domain materials that we have made available for use, unless Johns Hopkins University holds the copyright.

Extent

3.29 Cubic Feet (7 legal size document boxes)

Biographical Note

John Holladay Latané was born in Staunton, Virginia on April 1, 1869. He attended Baltimore City College, graduating in 1889. He entered The Johns Hopkins University, where he pursued both undergraduate and graduate studies. He received his Ph.D in 1895. From 1899-1902, Latané taught at Randolph-Macon College, and then joined the faculty of Washington and Lee in 1902. He left Washington and Lee in 1913 to take a position with Hopkins. Latané taught on the history faculty until his death in 1932.

Scope and Contents

The collection consists of writings, lectures and speeches, correspondence, research material, and material on the invention of the McCormick Reaper spanning 1913-1930. The writings (approximately 1913-1926) form the largest series and contain partial drafts of three of Latané's works: History of the United States (1918), History of American Foreign Policy (1927), and From Isolation to Leadership (1918, 1922). Latané was interested in the political issues surrounding World War I and the inter-war period. His concerns included the use of the Monroe Doctrine, neutrality, the role of the League of Nations, and U.S.-Latin American relations. These matters are reflected in both his writings and speeches. Essays on "Arbitration, Security and Disarmament," "The Monroe Doctrine and American Policy of Isolation in Relation to a Just and Durable Peace," and "The Revised Covenant of the League of Nations" illustrate his views. Unfortunately, the papers do not contain any letters by or to Latané that address contemporary concerns. The correspondence (1923-1926) is mostly administrative, and deals with graduate school admissions and job applications. Occasionally, Latané would go into greater detail with a student about his work. His correspondence with S. G. Coe discusses Coe's work on the Continental Congress and the finer points of his dissertation. Also, correspondence with J. Franklin Jameson of the Carnegie Institute, details dissertations in progress, dissertations finished and courses taught between 1923-1925. In 1913, Latané undertook an investigation of the invention of the reaper. Descendants of Cyrus McCormick's brother, Leander, claimed that the reaper had actually been Cyrus's father's idea. At the request of a Mrs. Emmons Blaine of Chicago, Latané researched (with the help of W. G. McDowell) the claims of both sides. He established, through contemporary newspaper accounts and interviews with long-time residents of Rockbridge County, Virginia, that Cyrus had indeed invented the reaper. Latané's research notes and a typescript of his findings form the McCormick Reaper series. The research material series consists mainly of printed material about World War I, the Mexican Revolution, and post-war issues gathered by Latané. Subjects covered include the League of Nations, the World Court, and United States-Latin American relations (particularly with Nicaragua).

Arrangement

The collection consists of five series: writings, lectures and speeches, correspondence, research material, and material on the invention of the McCormick Reaper spanning 1913-1930.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

The papers were probably transferred from the History Department after Latané's death.

Processing Information

Finding aid prepared by Margaret N. Burri in 1988.

Latané kept his articles and chapters in manila envelopes. Occasionally, the envelope had a title different than that on the typescript or manuscript. The envelope title, if any, has been filed with the draft.

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

Contact:
The Sheridan Libraries
Special Collections
3400 N Charles St
Baltimore MD 21218 USA