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Calcutta Photograph collection

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0330
The collection consists of photographs of Calcutta, India in the early 1940s, a printed map of Calcutta and Howrah, twelve prints of scenes in India, and one informational clipping about Calcutta removed from the Christian Science Monitor (March 1, 1974).

Dates

  • approximately 1942-1945, 1974
  • Majority of material found within 1942-1945

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is housed off-site and requires 48-hours' notice for retrieval. Please contact Special Collections for more information.

Collection is open for use.

Conditions Governing Use

Single copies may be made for research purposes. Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions. It is not necessary to seek our permission as the owner of the physical work to publish or otherwise use public domain materials that we have made available for use, unless Johns Hopkins University holds the copyright.

Extent

0.167 Cubic Feet (3/4 document box)

Administrative History

The album of photographs was purchased by Mrs. Marianne M. Doctor's husband while the couple was living in Calcutta, India at the time of the Second World War. The Doctors left Germany in 1938 and lived in India until the war's end when it became possible for them to emigrate to the United States. Professionally, Mr. Doctor worked as a dentist. Many Americans in the armed forces were stationed in Calcutta during the 1940s, and the Doctors often entertained the service people in their home. Mr. Doctor purchased the album of photographs which included scenes of the city and native people of India from an American soldier. The Doctors came to Baltimore in April 1947.

Scope and Contents

The collection consists of photographs of Calcutta, India in the early 1940s, a printed map of Calcutta and Howrah, twelve prints of scenes in India, and one informational clipping about Calcutta removed from the Christian Science Monitor (March 1, 1974). The largest part of the collection is formed by sixty photographs of Calcutta, India. They are 8x10, black and white, not dated, but most likely were taken 1942-1945 during the period of the Second World War when American armed forces where stationed in the city. The collection offers a perceptive view of Calcutta both as home to a diverse indigenous population and as a posting for foreign soldiers. The Indian people are portrayed at business, at worship, on the streets, traveling, entertaining, even in an opium den. Calcutta's streets, docks, temples, mosques, markets, and train stations are shown in the photographs. Many American soldiers are pictured browsing in the markets, and a few are shown working in areas where war materials were transported. The few items which complete the collection are twelve colored prints of native scenes and a newspaper article entitled "Calcutta somehow it will always survive." The prints were originally part of a calendar, and the article was written by Richard Critchfield.

Provenance

The collection was given to the University by Mrs. Marianne M. Doctor in March, 1989. The Accession Number is 88-89.18.

Processing Information

Finding aid prepared by Joan Grattan in June 1992.

The prints were originally fastened in an album, numbered 1-60, and included a typed caption at the bottom of the album page. The pictures have been removed from the album, filed numerically, and include the original descriptive captions.

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

Contact:
The Sheridan Libraries
Special Collections
3400 N Charles St
Baltimore MD 21218 USA