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Charles Carroll collection

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0363
Charles Carroll of Carrollton was born in Annapolis, MD on September 30, 1737. He was a member of the (Revolutionary) Maryland Convention (1774-1776), a member of the Continental Congress (1776-1778), and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The Charles Carroll collection is an artificial collection formed by both original and copied letters and documents, some related to the interests of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, and others related to persons and events important during the Revolutionary period and the years immediately following.

Dates

  • 1700-1971
  • Majority of material found within 1776 - 1867

Conditions Governing Access note

This collection is housed off-site and requires 48-hours' notice for retrieval. Please contact Special Collections for more information.

Collection is open for use.

Conditions Governing Use note

Single copies may be made for research purposes. Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions. It is not necessary to seek our permission as the owner of the physical work to publish or otherwise use public domain materials that we have made available for use, unless Johns Hopkins University holds the copyright.

Extent

0.47 Cubic Feet (1 legal size document box)

Biographical Note

Charles Carroll of Carrollton was born in Annapolis, MD on September 30, 1737. He received his early education in Jesuit schools in Maryland and France, and he later studied law in Paris and London. Carroll, the son of wealthy land owner, Charles Carroll of Annapolis (1702-1782), returned to colonial America and gave his support to the Revolutionary cause. He was a member of the (Revolutionary) Maryland Convention (1774-1776), a member of the Continental Congress (1776-1778), and a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Charles Carroll married Mary Darnall in 1768. They were the parents of Charles Carroll of Homewood (1775-1825), Mary (married Richard Caton), and Catherine (married Gen. Robert Goodloe Harper (1765-1825). Carroll, described often as the wealthiest man in the Colonies, had built for each of his children a very notable house. The most renown of the Carroll houses is Homewood House, built 1802 - 1804, for his only son. Homewood House remains today on the campus of The Johns Hopkins University and is recognized as an outstanding example of architecture of the early Federal period.

Charles Carroll of Carrollton died in Baltimore in 1832.

Scope and Contents

The Charles Carroll collection is an artificial collection formed by both original and copied letters and documents, some related to the interests of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, and others related to persons and events important during the Revolutionary period and the years immediately following. Important in this collection are copies of letters written by the elder Carroll to his son. Much of this correspondence deals with the construction and furnishing of Homewood House. The house was meant as a wedding present to young Carroll and his wife, Harriet Chew (1775-1861), but Carroll, Sr. continually expressed his displeasure over the mounting charges. (The final total was $40,000, four times what had been expected.) These letters are photocopied transcripts. Location of the originals is unknown. Items related to the family estate, Doughoregan, include a listing of slaves held in 1834 and a drawing of the plat, 1867. Holographic letters of American Revolutionary figures, Lafayette, Thomas Cooper, Alexander Hamilton, Benedict Arnold, and Nathanael Greene are included. Of interest too are holographic letters of persons important during the period following the American Revolution: Joshua Barney, Bernard U. Campbell, Richard Stoddert Ewell, John F. Mercer, and William Scott, all American military officers. Their letters contain some references to the War of 1812. Other correspondents include Baltimore historian Brantz Mayer.

Immediate Source of Acquisition note

The provenance of the collection is unclear. Part of the collection was presented to the University by Philip A. Carroll, the great-great grandson of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, in 1937.

An exhibit celebrating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Carroll of Carrollton was presented at the Baltimore Museum of Art in 1937. Possibly, at that time, Philip A. Carroll, owner of Doughoregan, the Carroll Family estate in Howard County, Maryland, re-opened a file of letters and documents while he was arranging for portraits and other family articles to be loaned for the exhibit.

Accruals note

Part of the collection was presented to the University by Philip A. Carroll, the great-great grandson of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, in 1937. The accession number is 88-89.19.

Related Archival Materials note

A letter from Charles Carroll of Carrollton to John Quincy Adams, dated 1827 March 19 is located in MS.0218 (John Quincy Adams collection).

Processing Information note

Processed by Joan Grattan. Additional processing by Emily Davidson and Jordon Steele, June 2015.

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

Contact:
The Sheridan Libraries
Special Collections
3400 N Charles St
Baltimore MD 21218 USA