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Review of T. S. Eliot's Translation of "Anabase," a poem originally written by Saint-John Perse

 Collection — Box: 1 [31151030133338], Folder: 5
Identifier: MS-0685
Copied from dealer description: "An insightful and favorable review by Galantiere, of the T.S. Eliot 1930 translation of "Anabase," a poem by Saint-John Perse. Galantiere is known for his translation of major works by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. Written by Saint-John Perse, "Anabase" was published in French in 1925."

Dates

  • 1930 September 4

Creator

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Collection is open for use.

Conditions Governing Use

Single copies may be made for research purposes. Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions. It is not necessary to seek our permission as the owner of the physical work to publish or otherwise use public domain materials that we have made available for use, unless Johns Hopkins University holds the copyright.

Extent

0.167 Cubic Feet (2 items)

Biographical / Historical

See Scope and Contents note.

Scope and Contents

Copied from dealer description: "[Review ofT.S. Eliot's Translation of "Ana base," a Poem Originally Written by Saint-John Perse).

Hamilton, Bennuda. September 4, 1930. Two (carbon?) typescripts with pencil marks. (11 x 8 1/2 inches). 16 single sheets; onion skin; [l]+l1PP and [1]+3PP. Original folds; some creases; very good.

Two annotated typescripts by translator Lewis Galantiere, (1895-1977).

An insightful and favorable review by Galantiere, of the T.S. Eliot 1930 translation of "Anabase," a poem by Saint-John Perse. Galantiere is known for his translation of major works by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. Written by Saint-John Perse, "Anabase" was published in French in 1925. T.S. Eliot's translation into English was published in London by Faber and Faber, who introduced it to readers in England and America shortly after the 1929 Market Crash. According to Galantiere, who comments on both the Perse French original and Eliot's translation, Perse's work was of singular worth-a serene, poetic rejection "of the civilization of trade." With a cover letter addressed to the editor, a Mr. Stroock, and dated September 4, 1930, Lewis Galantiere sent off his review of Eliot's translation. Along with the cover letter, ostensibly addressed to the editor of the magazine where the review was to be published, Galantiere sent revisions and pencil notes. This review, or a version of it, appeared in Volume 4 of Hound & Horn, a publication started at Harvard by Lincoln Kirstein for undergraduate students in 1927. Hound & Horn continued publication until 1934, attracting contributions from modernist writers in American and Europe. In 1930, however, Kirstein had just moved the journal to New York City from Cambridge. "Mr. Stroock" may have been the name of a student or a pseudonym. This peculiar address may provide additional clues to this document. By 1930, Galantiere had published original fictional works and had already gained a reputation as a daring translator. Besides transforming into English the works of Saint-Exupery, Galantiere translated French originals by Cocteau, Proust, and Zola."

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Purchased from Ian Brabner, September 2013.

Processing Information

Processed by Jordon Steele, March 2015.

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

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