Department of Military Science records Edit

Summary

Identifier
RG 04 190

Dates

  • 1918-2010 (Creation)

Extents

  • 2.82 Cubic Feet (Whole)
    2 record center cartons, 1 flat box (15.5 x 12 x 3 inches)

Names

Subjects

Notes

  • Processing Information

    This collection was processed in January 2016 by Annie Tang.

  • Preferred Citation

    [Name of folder or item], [Date], [Box number], [Folder number], [Collection title], [Collection number], Special Collections, The Johns Hopkins University.

  • Abstract

    With the passing of the National Defense Act on October 16, 1916, a unit of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps was formally established at Hopkins under what was then the Department of Military Science and Tactics (now known as the Department of Military Science). This collection primarily includes photographs and clippings (both mainly contained in photograph album pages). The collection also includes, to a lesser degree: photocopies of historical documents and historical research, correspondence, alumni information, reports, and course materials. The records span from 1918 to 2010.

  • Scope and Contents

    This collection primarily includes photographs and clippings (both contained in photograph album pages) pertaining to the Department of Military Science and the Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) at Johns Hopkins University. The collection also includes, to a lesser degree: photocopies of historical documents and historical research, correspondence, alumni information, reports, and course materials. The records span from 1918 to 2010.

  • Accruals

    Accession: 2012-13.UA.010, 2014-15.UA.021

  • Biographical / Historical

    The conflict with Spain that set Cuba free and made the United States responsible for the future of the Philippine Islands stirred the patriotism of Johns Hopkins undergraduates. On April 27, 1898, they assembled in old McCoy Hall and after an address by President Gilman and Dr. Gildersleeve, voted unanimously to form a company of volunteers and begin military drill. Nearly 100 students enrolled.

    In the academic year 1913-1914, when the University was planning to move from downtown Baltimore, it was proposed by the director of physical education, Dr. Ronald T. Abercrombie, to the acting president of the University, Dr. William H. Welch, to establish a military unit. Assurances had been given that the War Department would assist in a very positive way and would supply instructors to handle the basic courses in tactics and physical training. Members of the faculty were willing to open their classes for theoretical work even up through the advanced course.

    With the overwhelming details of moving to the Homewood campus, all the arrangements were not completed until early 1916 when it became known that Congress was likely to enact a law providing for military training in the colleges. At that time the undergraduates presented to University authorities a petition for the establishment of first of the proposed military departments. To be ready to act promptly whenever the law should become effective, the students formed a volunteer company of nearly a hundred and once again the campus echoed with martial sounds. Much of the credit for Hopkins receiving the first ROTC unit is due to the persistence of Dr. Abercrombie, the "Father of the Hopkins Army," and Dr. Murray P. Brush, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

    With the passing of the National Defense Act on October 16, 1916, a unit of the Reserve Officers Training Corps was formally established at Hopkins with Lieutenant C. Winslow Elliot assigned as Professor of Military Science and Tactics. He soon had about two hundred students enrolled in a program. Several of the early Johns Hopkins University Professors of Military Science and Tactics published the first manuals for ROTC instruction through the JHU Press.

    Source: http://www.jhurotc.com/page.php?page=about_the_battalion

  • Immediate Source of Acquisition

    The bulk of the materials were transferred to Special Collections in 2014.

  • Conditions Governing Use

    Single copies may be made for research purposes. Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions. It is not necessary to seek our permission as the owner of the physical work to publish or otherwise use public domain materials that we have made available for use, unless Johns Hopkins University holds the copyright.

  • Conditions Governing Access

    This collection is housed off-site and requires 48-hours' notice for retrieval. Please contact Special Collections for more information.

    Collection is open for use.

Collection Details