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École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts Paris [National School of Fine Arts Paris] UP6 ephemera and photographs

 Collection — Box: 1 [31151030132371], Folder: 4
Identifier: MS-0889
The École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts (National School of Fine Arts) in Paris succeeded the royal arts academies of pre-revolutionary France. The collection contains eight black-and-white photographs of the school in 1972 and ephemera concerning the creation of two new ateliers and a printing works at UP6 by the architect Jean-Paul Jungmann in 1972-74.

Dates

  • 1972 - 1974

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is housed off-site and requires 48-hours' notice for retrieval. Contact Special Collections for more information.

Conditions Governing Use

Single copies may be made for research purposes. Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions. It is not necessary to seek our permission as the owner of the physical work to publish or otherwise use public domain materials that we have made available for use, unless Johns Hopkins University holds the copyright.

Extent

.167 Cubic Feet (1 legal-sized folder)

Biographical / Historical

The École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts (National School of Fine Arts) in Paris succeeded the royal arts academies of pre-revolutionary France. Following protests across France in May 1968, precipitated by student strikes in Paris and Nanterre, the French government reformed the architecture division of the École des Beaux-Arts, creating autonomous units, called Unités Pédagogiques, each with its own administration and curriculum. Of the eight units in Paris, UP6 was the largest and most political, embracing a Marxist view of society and architecture. UP6 has since evolved into the École nationale supérieure d’Architecture de Paris–La Villette (Architecture School of Paris–La Villette).

Born in Strasbourg in 1935, Jean-Paul Jungmann is a French architect. He was a student and teacher at the École des Beaux-Arts and a founding member of the Utopie group, comprised of architects and sociologists. In March 1968, the group staged the “Structures gonflables” (Inflatable Structures) exhibition at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (Museum of Modern Art in the City of Paris). After the strikes of May 1968, the proliferation of new ateliers at the École des Beaux-Arts responded to the call for new forms of artistic expression and diversified instruction. Jungmann established two new ateliers at UP6, along with the printing works in 1972. From 1972-74, he edited two issues of ZZZ, an independent journal.

Sources: R. Chafee, “The Teaching of Architecture at the École des Beaux-Arts” in The Architecture of the École des Beaux-Arts, ed. A. Drexler (New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1977), pp. 60-109. J.-P. Jungmann, “Interview by Craig Buckley, Paris, June 22, 2007” in Clip, Stamp, Fold: The Radical Architecture of Little Magazines 196X to 197X, ed. B. Colomina (New York: Actar D, 2021), pp. 348-52.

Scope and Contents

The collection contains eight black-and-white photographs of the school in 1972: 1. Interior view of the Palais des Études (Great Hall of Studies) with its iron and glass roof; 2-3. Outer forecourt of the Palais des Études (Great Hall of Studies), looking west towards the Arc de Gaillon (removed in 1977) and the façade of the Great Hall; 4. Inner forecourt of the Palais des Études (Great Hall of Studies), looking south towards the Bâtiment des Loges; 5-6. Architectural elements on the grounds of the École des Beaux-Arts; 7. Door of the printing works, UP6; 8. Unknown.

The collection contains ephemera concerning the creation of two new ateliers and a printing works at UP6 by the architect Jean-Paul Jungmann in 1972-74. 1. A three-page text by Jungmann, dated March 6, 1972, proposes the creation of an atelier of graphic design and two-dimensional expression and an atelier of techniques of reproduction and planar multiplication (reprography, printing) to join other ateliers in a new department of media in UP6. 2. Distributed in the courtyard of the École des Beaux-Arts in 1972, a flier printed in offset advertises the creation of two new ateliers: an atelier of two-dimensional expression and an atelier of reproduction and planar multiplication. It states that the latter will open at the end of 1972 for the preparation of the journal of UP6. 3. A four-page brochure with illustrations and collage, printed in color offset and signed by Szabo and Jungmann, announces the status of their project in 1974. Beginning "Bonjour... Bonjour! (Hello... Hello!)," the brochure references the proposal above (no. 1) and states that the initial budget allowed them to set up and purchase equipment for the printing works of UP6, a photoengraving workshop, a design workshop, and a meeting place. It lists the equipment available for use in each location. A section on the journal ZZZ describes its goals and financial challenges after the publication of two issues. The collection also contains a typescript of the text. 4. Dated April 22, 1974, a four-page text with collage combines an update on the printing works with a brochure for the atelier of graphic expression. The text includes an overview of works produced by the print shop for the director/administration of UP6, the lecture committee, and ateliers/workshops. It reiterates the financial problems associated with publishing and distributing independent publications.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Purchased from Lecointre/Drouet in March 2018.

Processing Information

Processed by Brooke Shilling in October 2021.

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

Contact:
The Sheridan Libraries
Special Collections
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Baltimore MD 21218 USA