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Center for Metropolitan Planning and Research records

 Record Group
Identifier: RG-08-090

  • Staff Only
  • No requestable containers

Scope and Contents

The records of the Center for Metropolitan Planning and Research (Metro Center) span the years 1963 to 1985. They include correspondence of the center's director, Jack C. Fisher, research reports published by the center, copies of the center's newsletter, papers written by fellows while at the center, and the first annual report of the center's branch in Lille, France. The record group is subdivided as follows:

Subgroup 1: Publications of the Center, 1972-1985
Series 1: Occasional Papers, 1973-1983
Series 2: Census Notes, 1981-1985
Series 3: Reports, 1976-1985
Series 4: Newsletters, 1973-1985
Series 5: Fellows' Papers, 1972-1985

Subgroup 2: Professional Papers of Jack C. Fisher, 1963-1981
Series 1: General Correspondence, 1963-1971
Series 2: Wayne State Center for Urban Studies, 1967-1971
Series 3: International Urban Fellows Program, 1968-1972
Series 4: American-Yugoslav Project, 1965-1971
Subseries 1: General Correspondence, 1965-1971
Subseries 2: Subject Files, 1965-1976
Subseries 3: Papers, 1970-1976
Subseries 4: Personnel and Budget Records, 1968-1971
Series 5: Belgrade Transportation Project, 1968-1974
Series 6: Conferences, 1976-1981
Series 7: Metro Center Policy Committee, 1973-1980

Subgroup 3: Correspondence of John Dyckman, 1978-1980

Dates

  • Creation: 1966-1985

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

Administrative records in subgroups 2 and 3 are restricted for twenty-five years from their date of creation. Personnel records in subgroup 2 are also restricted.

Conditions Governing Use

Single copies may be made for research purposes. Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions. It is not necessary to seek our permission as the owner of the physical work to publish or otherwise use public domain materials that we have made available for use, unless Johns Hopkins University holds the copyright.

History

The Johns Hopkins Center for Urban Affairs was founded in 1969 as a University-wide interdisciplinary research center with a major grant from the Ford Foundation. Administratively a part of the School of Hygiene and Public Health and located on the University's East Baltimore campus, the center was created to serve as a catalyst for the promotion of research in urban studies by Hopkins faculty and students. It did not offer any degree program, although faculty associated with the center did teach courses both at Hygiene and in the School of Arts and Sciences.

In 1972, the resignation of center co-director Sol Levine to accept a post at Boston University gave Hopkins officials an opportunity to reorganize the center. Professor Jack C. Fisher, associate director of the Center for Urban Studies at Wayne State University, was brought in to be the center's new director, and it was renamed, becoming the Center for Metropolitan Planning and Research. Finally, the center was moved to the Homewood campus, and placed in the School of Arts and Sciences, in order to aid in cooperation with the University's social science departments.

Fisher brought two major programs with him from Wayne State. One, the International Urban Fellows Program, brought urban planners from Europe to the United States for a year of study and research. The other, the American-Yugoslav Planning Project, was the result of a cooperative venture by Fisher and the planners at the Urban Institute in Ljubljana, Yugoslavia. This program was responsible for a number of studies of the application of Western planning methods in a communist country, and its move to Hopkins was the beginning of the University's long involvement with Eastern Europe in general, and Yugoslavia in particular.

In an attempt to get the center more involved in the Baltimore community, the Policy Committee of the Metro Center was formed in 1973. Composed of concerned community leaders, scholars in the field of urban planning and Hopkins faculty members, the committee was organized to give general guidance to the center, suggesting areas of research, and attempting to interpret the center's findings from the perspective of its members. In order to work more effectively, the committee divided itself into subcommittees and task forces, specializing in such areas as housing, health care and minority economic development.

The center strengthened its European ties even more in 1983, when it opened an overseas branch in Lille, France. Directed by John W. Dyckman, a longtime friend of Fisher's and former member of the center's Baltimore staff, the Lille center shares facilities with the University of Lille, and is devoted to research into the transformation of local economies from dependence on heavy industry to reliance on high technology manufacturing.

Extent

6.65 Cubic Feet (17 letter size document boxes, 1 letter half-size document box)

Language of Materials

English

Provenance

These records were transferred by Dolores Sullivan, Senior Administrator, Center for Metropolitan Planning and Research

Accession Number

85.47, 88.4, 88.29

Processing Information

Finding aid prepared by Brian Harrington and James Knighton.

Title
Center for Metropolitan Planning and Research records
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin
Language of description note
Finding aid written in English

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

Contact:
The Sheridan Libraries
Special Collections
3400 N Charles St
Baltimore MD 21218 USA